corgibytes

7 Tips to Instantly Give Your Content Personality

Posted in ad copy, advertising, blog, blogging, branding, business, communication, conversation, copy, copywriting, corgibytes, creativity, customer service, marketing basics, small business, web copy, websites, word of mouth, work, writing on May 26th, 2010 by andrea – 5 Comments

Content with personality sells. Brands spend big bucks developing a distinct voice that makes them stand out. Conversational words engage your prospects instead of putting them to sleep, or worse, buying from someone else. This idea of copy that is personable and professional at the same time is what I built my career on. And here are some tips I’ve learned along the way to help your brand stand out from the pack.

1. Keep words and sentences short.
Big words do not make you sound smart. (I actually had to re-write that sentence. Originally it said, “Big words make you sound pretentious.” I have to keep even myself in check.) Long sentences make you seem boring. Readers, especially savvy web-oriented ones, don’t actually read — they scan. Short sentences keep these scanners more engaged, which leads to more sales. I try to keep most of my sentences to one thought, or clause. Sometimes two. More that that, and I try to break it up into separate sentences. Another way to put this idea is, “write like you talk.”

2. Use contractions.
When we’re talking casually, we use contractions — those “shortcut” words like can’t, won’t, shouldn’t, etc. We say – “I’d love to join you, but I can’t. Maybe next time, when I don’t have a conflict.”  In conversation, we’ll use the non-contracted form when we need to clarify or make a point. For example, “Joe, for the last time, I will not go on a date with you. Please, do not ask me again.” Using contractions instantly lightens the tone of your communications, and (you guessed it) makes your readers feel more engaged with your content.

3. Choose the “sparkle” word.
Which has more personality? “We’re happy to announce…” or “We’re thrilled to announce…” They essentially mean the same thing, but “thrilled” jumps out just a little more because it’s more exact. Happy is generic. It’s probably the first word you’ll reach for. Stretching just a little bit for that vibrant word can make your copy sing.

4. Write in the present tense, active voice, second person.
In non-academic terms, this means – avoid the words “have” or “been” and use the word “you”. Writing in this style is one of the most powerful ways to connect with your reader. It puts them in the here and now. It makes it feel like you’re having a conversation with them through the screen. Compare, for example, these two sentences: “We have enjoyed working with wonderful clients like you.” Versus, “You are a wonderful client. Thank you for your business. It makes ours more fun.” See the difference?

5. Know which (few) grammar rules you can break.
On occasion, I’ll start a sentence with “and”. I sometimes end with a preposition, too. That’s because these grammar rules help facilitate the conversational style. But there are some rules that when broken, make you look silly, or stupid, or ignorant. Here’s just a small sampling.

  • Your (you own it) vs. You’re (you are)
  • There (not here) vs. Their (it belongs to them) vs. They’re (they are)
  • Assure (give support) vs. Insure (to buy or sell insurance)
  • Affect (verb) vs. Effect (noun – can you put “the” in front of it?)
  • “A lot” is two words.

There are plenty more, and feel free to vent in the comments below. To keep your writing neat and tidy, try typing your opposing words in a search engine with “vs” between them. You can also check out The Grammar Girl.

6. Accessorize with styles.
Not to sound like your high-school English teacher, but rhetorical styles such as alliteration, metaphor, similes, rhyme, and repetition are marks of great writing. So use them. A word of caution though; too much of any of these styles, and you can easily swing to the other side of the personality pendulum (the one where you sound like an amateur and we don’t want that). It’s best to think of these styles like an accessory — add enough to accentuate your content, but not too much where you overwhelm the message.

7. Read out loud before you publish.
And by “out loud”, I don’t mean “really loud and slow but still in my head”. It means with your voice, at a natural volume. In addition to catching typos, this form of editing is perfect for making sure your content is conversational. Does it sound natural? If there’s a sentence that just doesn’t flow, work with it until it sounds right. Then, give your content to someone who hasn’t read it yet. Ask them to read it out loud. Then, massage any phrases that tripped them up.

With these simple tweaks, you can transform writing that’s bland and impersonal, into content that brings your readers closer to your brand. These are great tips for all sorts of business communications in both print and web. Have a question about how to implement these styles? Have a story about how you turned your copy around? Want to vent about your grammar pet peeves? Put it in the comment below.

Thanks, and happy writing!

10 Tips for a Kickass Wanted Ad

Posted in corgibytes, marketing on January 15th, 2010 by andrea – Be the first to comment

Here’s a great example of how to write a job description that works. I found this on Andy Sernovitz’s blog (a must have on your RSS feed if you ask me.)

Benifit-driven conversational copy gets you noticed.

10 Reasons why it works:

  1. The first word. You. Not me, I, we or any other form of the first person. You. It grabs the reader’s attention and makes your message relevant.
  2. Conversational tone. “Here’s the deal” is a great opening line. It closes the gap between the writer and reader. It makes your reader feel like they’re face-to-face, and opens an emotional bond. And in advertising, that’s a powerful thing.
  3. Clear benefits. Your reader wants to know, “What’s in it for me”. Give them clear and meaningful examples. Andy does a great job here with, “You will become a rock star with badass contacts. We will find you a job when you graduate.”
  4. Name dropping. Works every time. If you have the clout and the contacts, make it known.
  5. Edgy. Yes, this ad uses words like “shitwork” and “badass”. But it works here because of the audience. It makes your ad stand out amid a sea of corporate babble. Just make sure that you have the corporate culture to pull it off.
  6. Authentic. There’s no guessing that this job will require a lot of effort and work. In fact, they come out and say “You will be exhausted.” But transparency and honesty about the job (especially early in the process) just make you more credible.
  7. Keywords instead of tasks. “Blogging, Youtube, Social Media, Viral, Word of Mouth…” describe what the job is about without saying what the employee will be doing on a day-to-day basis. This helps ensure that qualified candidates won’t self-select out because they perceive they’re under qualified.
  8. Short & Simple. At just over 100 words, this ad packs punch. In just a glance and a quick scan, you clearly understand what Andy’s looking for and whether or not it’s a good fit for you. No need to drone on and on. We’re all too busy to read useless information.
  9. Written for the audience. This ad might not be the best fit if you were trying to find a more senior position, but for an intern, the edgy and conversational tone is perfect. This is how 19 year olds speak. Write how you (and your audience) speak.
  10. Clear call to action. “How to apply: blow my mind” (love this!) followed by three websites where you can learn more. Clear next steps are critical for increased response.

What are your thoughts? Is this an effective Wanted Ad? Or did it cross the line? Would you apply? Would you pass it on?

To your success,

Andrea :D

Twitter Translated from Geek Into English

Posted in corgibytes, marketing on August 18th, 2009 by andrea – 1 Comment

twitter_logoTwo years ago I posted how twitter was a “complete waste of my time”. No one I knew used it. Searching was clunky. They didn’t even have a model to generate revenue (still don’t).

But the tipping point has arrived. It caught my eye in the form of an article from ClickZ titled “Twitter Surpasses Facebook as Top Link in Email.” Really? What! That silly little tweeting thing actually has value?

Indeed. That same article linked to a report that linked deep social engagement to revenue and profit. A big part of that “deep” social engagement is Twitter. All 4 case studies in the report (Starbucks, Toyota, SAP, and Dell) use Twitter as a key piece of their media strategy.

So it’s clear — there’s a benefit. But now what? What are some ways the average Joe/Jane can use Twitter…without feeling overwhelmed? As a self-professed “non-techie”, here are some ideas and resources for you, along with answers questions you probably have.

How does Twitter work?
You have 140 characters to answer the question “What are you doing right now?” Your response is called a “tweet.” If you provide interesting content, people will want to “follow” you. This means that whatever you post shows up on their homepage. Getting followers is a good thing.

What makes my content interesting?
Genuine content = interesting content. Being authentic = intriguing. If you’re too self promotional (or heaven forbid, a spammer) no one will want to follow you. In fact, you’ll be shunned. I find interesting content to be: 1) a link to an article or blog post (tinyurl.com will be your friend) , or 2) a peek into your expertise or personal life

Why do people care what I’m doing?
Two reasons. 1) Connection. People gravitate towards people who are like minded. Having stuff in common is the first step towards forming a connection.  2) Curiosity. It’s like when you’re traveling through a neighborhood and people have their windows open. You look. Not because it’s creepy but because you’re curious. Plus, the open window invites you. It gives you permission to glance, but not stalk.

Isn’t it just a bunch of nonsense and noise?
Nope. It’s a way to meet people who you might actually like, enjoy, do business with, get a job from, be entertained by, or gather information from.

Here’s an example:

My brother Brian (@GouletPens) makes Pens for a living. He went to a directory of twitter users called wefollow.com and typed “pens” to find people who were also passionate about pens. He started following @Dowdyism, a “pen addict extraordinaire”. @Dowdyism noticed Brian and started following him.

Now, you would think that these two pen fanatics would bond over their writing instrument obsession, but that’s just what got them in the door. They corresponded over Wii. Here are the screenshots:

Brian posted this to Twitter

Brian posted this to Twitter

and then, a few minutes later…

...and dowdyism (a potenital influencer for Brian) responded

...and dowdyism (a potenital influencer for Brian) responded

It’s a connection that probably wouldn’t have occurred if Brian had used DM, email, TV, radio, or another traditional marketing channel. But now, looks like he’s in.

What are all those crazy RT, @, and # things all over the page?

RT – This is a Retweet. It’s something that someone found on another twitter page. Let’s say Amy posts a really useful article. Ben sees it and knows his followers would really enjoy reading it, too. Ben copies the tweet, but inserts RT @Amy (or whatever her Twitter name is). Why do this? 1) It’s polite. It also shows transparency (which is a very good thing in social media). 2) It let’s Amy know her tweet was helpful to you so she is a) more likely to tweet more about that and b) sees who her biggest fans are.

@ – This links a twitter screen name.  If you start your post with @soandso, the person who has the screen name “soandso” will see your message, and it will show up as a tweet on your home page (but not on all your followers). You can also send someone a direct message (if you follow each other), which is kind of like a shortened form of email.

# - This is a hash tag. It’s sort of like a keyword so you can sort by categories. This helps you organize and find information more easily. According to Wild Apricot,

Hashtag etiquette is still evolving, so let good social manners be your guide. It is a rare “tweet” that deserves a hashtag, so tag only those updates that you feel will add significant value to the conversation. One hashtag is best — two are permissable — but three hashtags seem to be the absolute maximum, and risk raising the ire of the community. Tag sparingly, and with careful discretion.

How do I find people to follow?

Here are several ways:

  1. When you sign up for Twitter, it can automatically port your contacts from Gmail, Yahoo! or AOL. Mighty convenient and worth taking the extra 20 seconds during setup.
  2. You can also click “Find People” in the top right corner when you’re signed into twitter.
  3. Check out a twitter directory. There are several. If you need to find some, just google “twitter directory”. The best (to date) is wefollow.com.
  4. Click on who’s following you — right under your picture in the top right of the sidebar. Is there someone interesting?
  5. Click the @yourscreenname link just below that. This will show you tweeters who have mentioned you in one of their tweets.

Yikes, people I don’t know are following me….what should I do?

Step 1: Don’t freak out. You don’t have to “open the window” any more than you’re comfortable. If you don’t feel okay sharing something on Twitter, then don’t. It’s that simple.

Step 2: Remember your role. You’re publishing and sharing content for people to read. If you wrote for a magazine, people who you didn’t know would read your article and maybe write a letter to connect with you. Twitter lets you do the same thing. You publish content that you find valuable, and people who find it interesting read it, subscribe so they can read more, and might even contact you to comment on it.

Step 3: Adjust your privacy settings. If you don’t want people who you don’t know to follow you, go to Settings and click “Protect My Tweets”.

Step 4: Block spammers. If someone is spamming you, or you don’t want them to follow you, block them. Show ‘em who’s boss.

How often should I tweet?
Tweet when you have something you want to share or say. Don’t just tweet to hear yourself type. Remember, this about connecting with people, not shouting about how great you are. You can ask a question, link to an article, or type a musing…it’s up to you. Expert tweeters post anywhere from 1 – 20 times per day. More than that, and you’ll start clogging your followers feeds. That annoys them.

Resources:

Here are some places I went to learn what I posted here  (thanks Sean, Carmen & Marvin for helping me find these!):

http://business.twitter.com/twitter101

http://www.businesspundit.com/10-essential-twitter-tools-for-business/

http://www.cio.com/article/492019/Twitter_Bible_Everything_You_Need_To_Know_About_Twitter

http://followontwitterlists.com/

Happy tweeting!

Oh, you can follow me if you’d like. @andreagoulet

Flesh Out vs. Flush Out — Either way it’s disgusting

Posted in corgibytes, marketing on April 20th, 2009 by andrea – 11 Comments

Recent conversation with co-worker:

Me: This has been a great brainstorming. I’m going to go back to my desk and flush out some of these ideas.

She: Sounds good. Wait. Did you just say ‘flush out’….that always makes me think of a toilet. Ewww…I’m pretty sure you meant ‘flesh out’.

Me: ‘Flesh out’? No. I don’t think so. That makes me think of a deer carcass that someone is skinning. I’ll take the toilet image over mangling Bambi any day.

So what’s the correct answer?

Here, here, here, here, here and here say that the correct idiomatic expression for “adding details to an idea” is….drum roll….flesh out. Looks like I was wrong on this one. (groan.)

But wait!

Here, here, and  here, indicate that flush out means to “bring something that is hidden to the surface” (search this term on Google and you’ll find all sorts of strange references from hunting to earwax.)

So….

Here’s some rationale for using “flush out” for specific writing tasks (because I simply can’t concede that I’m wrong):

As a copywriter, my job is to go through a big thick creative brief, brainstorm 50+ ideas, and then bring the best parts to the surface so the message is no longer hidden among the rest of the unecessary details. Therefore, I “flush out” the concept.

Totally up for debate. What do you think?

Blogging lessons from Walden Pond

Posted in corgibytes, writing on October 15th, 2008 by andrea – 4 Comments

I think Henry David Thoreau would have made an excellent blogger. I’m currently listening to Walden, his account from an over two year sojourn of isolated living, in a cabin he built himself, along the shores of Walden Pond, in Concord, MA in the late 1800s.

Basically, the book was born of the following perspective:

- I did something quirky

- People were curious about it

- So I wrote down why I did it and what I learned from it

Blogging basically follows the same formula. When you breathe life into the facts of an account through stories and personal experiences, you form a connection with the reader. Readers enjoy feeling connected, so they read more.

Now, Thoreau does have some long-winded pontifications, and learning the art of concise communication is another important aspect of successful blogging. But the essence of your account can still be obtained.

Take for example a more modern day account of simplifying your life. Andrea Dickson over at WiseBread gives an interesting perspective on why she doesn’t own a television. It’s quirky. She explained why she did it. And she offers lessons from her experience. And the result? Over 60 comments in a week.

50 Ideas to Immediately Combat Writers Block

Posted in corgibytes, marketing, work, writing on April 13th, 2008 by andrea – 17 Comments

Help image

Writer’s block – the dreaded enemy of all authors. This post features ideas on how you can scale it, get over it, and be on your merry way in a flash.

1. Read blogs about your subject.

2. Cover your computer screen and go stream of consciousness.

3. Get some fresh air and go for a walk/run.

4. Visit a museum.

5. Browse photos at istockphoto.com.

6. Interview people regarding your topic.

7. Visit an online forum and see what others are saying.

8. Change your scenery. Move your writing to a coffee shop or park.

9. Look around your house and make associations with inanimate objects.

10. Organize your workspace. A clear desk means a clear mind.

11. Draw instead using storyboards.

12. Ask a question to your network on LinkedIn or Facebook.

13. Take a bubble bath.

14. Go to a busy place and people watch.

15. Meet with other writers using meetup.com

16. Mind map your subject.

17. Browse Youtube for videos regarding your subject.

18. Go to the library and check out books.

19. Use the visual thesaurus to get ideas for new words.

20. Talk to a kid.

21. Stare out a window.

22. Record yourself talking – then transcribe your thoughts.

23. Go to itunes or napster. Type your subject into the search box & listen to those songs.

24. Paint or draw a picture of your subject.

25. Cook a meal that your character or target market would enjoy.

26. Take a nap.

27. Outline the big picture.

28. Write about your goals for this project.

29. Meditate.

30. Work backwards. Write the ending first.

31. Read inspiring quotes.

32. Listen to “Unwritten” by Natasha Bedingfield.

32. Dance.

33. Look at a lava lamp.

34. Write a list of nouns synonymous with your subject.

35. Write a list of adjectives that describe your subject.

36. Write a list of verbs that your subject would do.

37. Lie down in a patch of grass & watch the clouds go by.

38. Call a friend or family member and get their opinion.

39. Braindump all of your “to dos” onto a piece of paper to clear your mind.

40. Eat a stalk of celery.

41. Paint your toenails a pretty pink. Not your thing? Try using a powertool to make something.

42. Sing at the top of your lungs.

43. Close your eyes and take 10 deep breaths.

44. Stretch.

45. Balance your chakras.

46. Visit freerice.com & expand your vocabulary

47. Change your font or writing instrument.

48. Work on a different project.

49. Change the lighting in your room.

50. Add your idea in the comment section below, bookmark this page & reference it again the next time you have writers block.

Related Links

Top 10 Tips for Overcoming Writer’s Block – by Ginny Wiehardt

Overcoming Writer’s Block: 5 Writing Exercises – by Genevieve Thiers

Generating Story Ideas and Overcoming Writer’s Block – by Mignon Fogarty

Increase Brand Awareness with Clever Copy in the Nooks & Crannies

Posted in accounting, ad copy, ads, advertising, branding, business, conversation, cool websites, copy, copywriting, corgibytes, creativity, culture, customer service, direct mail, e-commerce, entrepreneur, funny, high speed, influential websites, internet, marketing, online, sales, stand out, web copy, websites, work, writing on April 7th, 2008 by andrea – 1 Comment

Hiding in the corners beneath the bold headlines, under the compelling benefit statements, and around the action-packed verbs are bountiful opportunities to inject your brand with personality. A recent trend is “nooks & crannies copy” as I’m calling it, because it often pops up in unexpected places. Here are three examples:

1. Yahoo Chat

Yahoo Chat Screenshot

While it may be difficult to see in this picture, Yahoo has brilliantly introduced humor into their chat feature. Between the conversation above and the text box below is the status report indicating if the other person is typing a message. However, instead of a plain and boring “Apple123 is typing a message….”, yahoo has sprinkled clever anecdotes such as:

  • Apple123 really should learn to type with more than two fingers…
  • STAND BY FOR A MESSAGE FROM APPLE123
  • Apple123 is about to drop knowledge…
  • Apple123 is hammering out a wicked comeback…
  • Bate your breath, Apple123 is typing…

among a plethora of others.

While not directly selling anything, introducing conversational wit in this unexpected place allows Yahoo! to showcase their brand’s personality. It gives the user the impression that Yahoo! is a fun, easy to work with company that doesn’t take itself to seriously.

2. Verizon Wireless

Verizon Highspeed Internet Loading Icon

Located directly before a purchasing decision, this otherwise overlooked loading page has been transformed into a mini flash ad that reinforces the product’s effectiveness right before the sale. The ad shows an animated film strip loaded with a series of technological leaps. The last one, “From Dial Up…To High Speed Internet” subtly suggests “You wouldn’t live in a cave, would you? Then why on earth would you have dial up?” An effective suggestion, I would imagine.

3. You Need a Budget (YNAB)

YNAB screenshot

Jesse Mecham, the developer of YNAB, tells the story of how he and is wife needed a personal budgeting system. They developed a simple excel spreadsheet that over the years has developed into a sophisticated yet user-friendly budgeting tool. While the site has been dramatically improved on the design side, Jesse still maintains the heartfelt honesty in his conversational copy, as evidenced by the “Download Update” screen for his product. He is an accountant, and occasionally a grammatical error will pop up in his copy, but it doesn’t seem to matter when it comes to the bottom line. His conversational style is obviously effective due to the growth and endorsements of YNAB.

Related Links

Three Tips to Make Your Copy Conversational - by Mila Sidman

How to Make the Online Sales Copy for Your Website More Conversational - by Evelyn Lim

The Right Way to Write Sales Copy - by Anthony Vicenza

10 Tactics for Top-Notch Testimonials

Posted in ad copy, ads, advertising, branding, business, copy, copywriting, corgibytes, entrepreneur, linked in, linkedin, market research, marketing, marketing basics, sales, small business, techniques, viral marketing, word of mouth, work, writing on March 31st, 2008 by andrea – 5 Comments

Testimonials – the magical way to turn boasting into evangelism. Sure, they’re effective – and their use is hyped in every corner of marketing communications. But just how do you go about gathering them? Here are 10 ideas:

1. Have something worth talking about. Having a mediocre product that simply meets expectations encourages silence. People talk about something that is either 1) really awful or 2) really amazing. The closer you are to the middle, the less chatter you hear.

2. Put a feedback button on your website. Encourage your customers to send you their opinions – regardless of whether they’re “good” or “bad”. In truth, they’re all good.

3. Give to get. The networking organization BNI hypes the benefits of “givers gain”. And it’s true. Give colleagues a well-written testimonial and ask for one in return.

4. Use LinkedIn. Log in to your LinkedIn account and under the “Service Providers” tab at the top left click on “Request a Recommendation”.

5. Paraphrase & e-mail. When a client gives you a verbal testimonial, send a friendly e-mail thanking them for the conversation, paraphrasing what you heard and requesting permission to use their testimonial.

6. Give stories the spotlight. Weight Watchers encourages participants to submit success stories. Stories sell. Bragging bores.

7. Market research sweepstakes. Give respondents a prize for completing a survey about your company. Prizes encourage response rates.

8. Ask for specifics. When writing a survey, break down large, open-ended questions into bite-sized, directive questions which are more likely to receive a response.

9. Give credit. Did a great idea come from customer submitted feedback? Share the credit to entice readers to share their opinions.

10. Strength in numbers. When requesting testimonials, ask for quantitative data. For example, “After hiring Randy, my profit increased by 20%” or “Gina helped reduce my production time from 2 weeks to 3 days.”

Related Links

Fastread: How to Get Testimonials for Your Product by WorkatHomeChannel

How to Get Quality Testimonials by Mike Williams

5 Tips for Getting Freakin’ Awesome Testimonials by Brent Hodgson

Make Your Message Bounce With a Game of Verbal Tennis

Posted in ad copy, ads, branding, buzz, communication, conversation, copy, copywriting, corgibytes, creativity, entrepreneur, marketing, new media, pr, pr 2.0, Public relations, sales, small business, social media, writing on February 6th, 2008 by andrea – 4 Comments

tennis_racket.jpgI’m currently reading Geoff Livingston’s New Media Primer Now Is Gone (a great read for anyone seeking practical advice on how to use new media in a marketing strategy). In the introduction, Brian Solis makes a point that really got me thinking.

“Conversations are driving the new social economy…Messages are not conversations. This is where most companies and PR people fall down. People just don’t communicate that way…Markets are not comprised of audiences…This is about speaking with, not “to” or “at” people.”

I couldn’t agree more and it got me thinking – what’s the difference between a message and a conversation?

Obviously, a message is one-way communication and a conversation is not. Rather, a conversation is like verbal tennis where words and ideas bounce back and forth between both parties.

Think of it this way…

A “message” is like playing shotput. You put all your effort into forcing information forward. It’s not about having the ball returned, instead it’s about pushing as hard and far as you can. The problem with verbal shot put is that there’s little room for feedback or interaction with your customers, which increases the risk of a missed message.

Shotput is not about being accurate, it’s about using your energy to blast your message far and long. While this strategy used to work when the landscape was less competitive, the goal of communication in this new paradigm is to make your message bounce.

How to do this?

1. Statements vs. Questions - A simple way to encourage conversation is by asking a question instead of a making a statement.

Example:
Shotput: You’ll save money and time with Product X
Tennis: What would you do with an extra 30 minutes a day? Use Product X, find out, and then tell us about it!

2. Yes/No vs. Open-Ended - The type of question also determines the game you’re playing. Yes/No questions solicit short and boring responses. While traditional sales training encourages the use of questions that “will always result in a yes,” I believe consumers are smart enough to pick up on this sales tactic and quickly pack up their attention and leave when they sense its use. Opting for honest and conversational open-ended questions is a successful strategy.

Example:
Shotput: Are you looking to save money and time? Then buy Product X.
Tennis: What would you do with an extra 30 minutes a day? Use Product X, find out, and then tell us what you did! (Imagine coupling this with a prize to entice customers to submit stories)

3. Go beyond WWWWW&H - Questions aren’t the only way to get the ball bouncing. Using “feeling” verbs is a great way to encourage your customer’s imagination. Try peppering your copy with words like “imagine” or “discover” and allow your reader’s mind to soar.

Example:
Shotput: Product X will make you feel 10 years younger.
Tennis: Remember how you felt when you were 10 years younger? Imagine feeling that way again. Product X can help.

Ready to return the serve? Just write a comment below. :)

Related Links

Why Great Copy Is a Conversation, Not a Soliloquy – Dan O’Sullivan

Beware of Self Congratulatory Web Copy – Laura Bergells

Ad Copy That Attempts to Say Everything – Sometimes Says Nothing – Marc Davison

Brainstorming vs. Editing

Posted in advertising, business, copy, copywriting, corgibytes, creativity, entrepreneur, marketing, small business, stand out, success, work, writing on January 31st, 2008 by andrea – 1 Comment

So I have the green light to continue with the blogging (you may notice the lovely disclaimer under my picture, just to be on the safe side). Horray! Let the blogging continue.

Here’s a thought…

How should you respond to someone who says “OMG – We could (insert crazy idea here).”

a) “That would never work.”

b) “Maybe, but we’d have to do a lot of things to make it work.”

c) “What a great idea! We could also (insert a different crazy idea here).”

The correct answer is c.

There are two parts to creation – brainstorming and editing. You brainstorm first and edit later.

In brainstorming mode, rules do not apply. You have an unlimited budget, no legal problems, and zero logistical hurdles. The goal is to purge the crazy and wacky ideas from your brain and get them down on paper. The sky’s the limit – dream big!

Then….much later…..

You edit. You look at your crazy ideas and say “This is a great idea, how can we make it work in the real world?” You’d be surprised how achievable many of those crazy ideas actually are. Don’t kill them – incubate them!